June 29, 2014

(Source: voquest, via dirtydeedsdyan)

June 1, 2014
punkeronipizza:

see thru feet by willlaren on Flickr.

punkeronipizza:

see thru feet by willlaren on Flickr.

May 8, 2014

moshita:

Interiors-Exteriors

Ruven Kuperman

May 6, 2014

rfmmsd:

Artist & Sculptor:

Sarah Best

"Pull Yourself Together"

Mixed Media

Ceramic, Soft (Yarn, Cotton, Fabric), Other

48” x 32” x 6” Inches

https://www.facebook.com/sarah.best.315?fref=ts

(Source: sarahbestny.com, via sunshineandgunpowdr)

May 5, 2014
moshita:

A Heart for Salt
Anna Bormann & Selma Serman

moshita:

A Heart for Salt

Anna Bormann & Selma Serman

May 4, 2014

biomedicalephemera:

Top: Primary mammary blood vessels, deep tissue of nipple, outer nipple and areola

Bottom: Lymphatic supply to breast, vertical view of mammary duct exit, lactiferous ducts

The human breast is an odd organ, even among mammals. It is significantly developed even before pregnancy, while most mammals develop only the ductal regions (the nipple and its connecting supply) prior to parturition, and its variance between individuals can be massive.

The lactiferous ducts are the smallest units of the lactation (milk-supplying) system of the breast, and the epithelial cells within them extract the nutrients and liquid from the lymphatic and circulatory system when they’re triggered by the hormone prolactin, which is secreted both in response to labor and from suckling. Though the massive dose of prolactin from late-term pregnancy and giving birth is what kick-starts milk production, the suckling action is what keeps it going. In some humans (even some males), the prolactin secretion in response to sustained suckling is enough to begin producing milk, themselves.

Atlas d’Anatomie Descriptive du Corps Humain. C. Bonamy and Paul Broca, 1866.

May 3, 2014
trevni-street-art:

not—banksy:

Nychos the Weird

trevni-street-art:

not—banksy:

Nychos the Weird

(via nekse)

May 1, 2014
moshita:

Empty Space Skull
Karine Jollet

moshita:

Empty Space Skull

Karine Jollet

April 30, 2014

evolvinglogic:

policymic:

Doctor saves child’s life by practicing heart surgery on 3D-printed model

Heart surgery is an extremely difficult procedure. Even more so when the tiny anatomy of a small child is involved. When 14-month old Roland Lian Cung Bawi’s heart was failing him, his surgeon Erle Austin knew that he had to prepare meticulously for an intricate operation. Initially he consulted other surgeons, but this yielded conflicting advice. So Austin turned to 3D printing for help.

Using the facilities at the University of Louisville’s engineering school, Austin and his medical team produced a three dimensional model of little Ronald’s heart. Pediatric operations are difficult because the interior structures of a child’s organs are small and hard to see clearly. This model allowed the surgical team to come up with a precise plan to limit the amount of exploratory incisions, reduce operating time and prevent the need for follow-up operations.

Read moreFollow @policymic

Fuck. This is important.

(Source: micdotcom, via petitsirena)

April 30, 2014

nevver:

Anatomy Lesson

(via hotglued)